Pop-up art takes NoBo by storm

Longtime home to the Lincoln Theatre, and most recently Homeport Gallery, the King-Lincoln District is no stranger to the Columbus arts scene. But the neighborhood has never experienced anything like what is to come this summer.

Rooms to Let Temporary Art Space has announced its summer series of pop-up projects and exhibitions, which culminate in a neighborhood crawl on May 18. The event will present over ten exhibitions and projects from local and regional artists; creations span a multitude of mediums including sound, interactive performance, a massive camera obscura, invasive sculpture, text, and art “in the dark”.

28 artists will be represented in the crawl, which will lead visitors from house to house along N 20th and 21st streets in Homeport’s North of Broad neighborhood in the King-Lincoln District. Food carts will also be present, celebrating both the artists and the neighborhood in which these pieces live.

Rooms to Let supports projects that are social, individual, site-specific, collaborative, and multi-disciplinary. Artists are asked to acknowledge both the status of the house and the property's role within its neighborhood; the primary goal is in bringing a neighborly familiarity to contemporary art practice. Through incredibly diverse and experimental projects, Rooms to Let supports a rare mix of artists and visitors who leave considering the function of art and place, and, of course, the opportunities of unoccupied homes.

You can RSVP on Facebook by clicking here. 

----

About Rooms to Let

Rooms to Let was founded in 2010 by local artist and curator Melissa Vogley Woods as a means to provide artists the opportunity to work in diverse environments. By placing artists within an anomalous environment, Rooms to Let challenges the traditional constructs of an exhibition space and supports the local development of contemporary art and public art projects.  http://roomstolettemporaryartspace.com 

Rooms to Let supports projects that are social, individual, site-specific, collaborative, and multi-disciplinary. Artists are asked to acknowledge both the status of the house and the property's role within its neighborhood; the primary goal is in bringing a neighborly familiarity to contemporary art practice. Through incredibly diverse and experimental projects, Rooms to Let supports a rare mix of artists and visitors who leave considering the function of art and place, and, of course, the opportunities of unoccupied homes.